The Problem
 
Bright, low-income students are less likely to apply, less likely to receive an offer and less likely to graduate than their higher-income peers

Less likely to apply

High-achieving students from non-traditional backgrounds are far less likely to apply to top universities than their more affluent peers – even when they receive the same results in their exams.

In the UK, half of students with AAB in their A-levels do not attend a Russell Group university. The likelihood that a student who qualifies for free school meals makes it to Oxford or Cambridge is 1 in 1,500. For the privately educated, it is 1 in 20.


 
 

Less likely to receive an offer

A UK government report found there is a state school ‘penalty’ in the admissions process equivalent to one A-level grade. This means a state school student who applies to a Russell Group university would need to achieve one grade higher in their A-levels to have the same chances of being admitted to a Russell Group university as an otherwise identical privately educated student.

Students in private schools often receive a high level of support and encouragement during the university application process, which typically isn't available to students from low-income backgrounds.


 
 

Less likely to graduate

At Russell Group Universities in the U.K., students from low-income communities were 50% more likely to drop out than their peers from high-income backgrounds.


The problem illustrated

 
 
 *difference is likely to be even more pronounced when looking at the more selective universities within the Russell Group universities that Project Access targets

*difference is likely to be even more pronounced when looking at the more selective universities within the Russell Group universities that Project Access targets

That's what Project Access is here to change!